Create a Blog with JBoss Seam, Hibernate JPA and JSF then Deploy it to Tomcat in the Cloud – Part IV

Seam Tomcat Deployment Tutorial Part 4
In this part of the tutorial we will correct the bugs inherent in version 2.2 of Seam-gen and we will add some code to spice up our blog CMS.

First of all, our PostEdit.seam page is not working at all as it is. We shall fix this:

Fixing the PostEdit.xhtml page

Figure 4.1 - Fixing the PostEdit.xhtml page

Open PostEdit.xhtml from the WebContent folder and find the <rich:tabPanel switchType=”ajax”> block. This is what’s causing the problem, because it has more than one tab – one to have the user select a category from a grid on another page, and the second one for selecting a user, since these two entites have @ManyToOne relationships to the post entity, and Seam-gen can’t handle generating more than one joined object selection user interface item in this version.

I don’t want an external grid for selection of a category anyway, so we will delete the entire <rich:tabPanel> block on this page, and instead make the category selectable from a pop-up menu using a typical JSF selectOneMenu UI component.

After you delete the <rich:tabPanel> go towards the beginning of the page and locate the code block starting with <s:decorate id=”titleField” template=”layout/edit.xhtml”>.
Within that block replace <h:inputTextarea id=”title” cols=”80″ rows=”2″ required=”true” value=”#{postHome.instance.title}”/> with <h:inputText id=”title” required=”true” value=”#{postHome.instance.title}”/>

Next, add the following code block below the closing tag (</s:decorate>) for titleField:

           <s:decorate id="categoryField" template="layout/edit.xhtml">
                <ui:define name="label">Post Category</ui:define>
                <h:selectOneMenu id="category"
                           required="true"
                              value="#{postHome.instance.title}">
                     <s:selectItems value="#{categoryList.resultList}" var="cat" label="#{cat.name}" noSelectionLabel="Please select..." />
                     <s:convertEntity />
                </h:selectOneMenu>
            </s:decorate>

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Create a Blog with JBoss Seam, Hibernate JPA and JSF then Deploy it to Tomcat in the Cloud – Part III

Seam Tomcat Deployment

In this part III of the tutorial, we’ll build the entity classes from the database we created in Part I and configure the Seam project we created in Part II so as to make it fully compatible with Apache Tomcat.

Creating The Model Layer

We’ll use Hibernate‘s reverse engineering tool (hbm2java) embedded in Seam-gen to create the entity classes from the database we created in part 1.

Seam Generate Entities

Figure 3.1 - Generating entities from database in JBoss Seam

Right-click the project blog in project explorer and select New > Seam Generate Entities.

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Create a Blog with JBoss Seam, Hibernate JPA and JSF then Deploy it to Tomcat in the Cloud – Part II

JBoss Seam - Tomcat

In part I of the tutorial, I provided the instructions about the development environment and  how to create the blog’s database. In this part II, using Eclipse’s JBoss tools plugin, we’ll create and configure the JBoss Seam web project and prepare it for full Tomcat-compatibilty and for the creation the basic CRUD (create, read, update and delete) functionality of entities which will be reverse engineered from the database using hbm2java embedded in Seam-gen whose GUI version comes built-in with JBoss Tools.

The Development Environment

To be able to follow the tutorial and reproduce the same results, it’s best (if not mandatory) that you have exactly the same version of the tools and plug-ins I mentioned in the previous post. As of this part (and so on) I’ll instruct on Eclipse Helios with JBoss Tools 3.2. You can also refer to my post titled ‘Matrix of compatible platforms and runtimes with JBoss Tools‘ to see which version of Eclipse and other stuff (such as Seam framework version) is compatible with which version of JBoss tools plugin, etc.

So here we go. Now launch Eclipse if you already haven’t done so.

Changing perspective in Eclipse

Figure 2.1 - Changing perspective in Eclipse

First of all, we shall change the perspective in Eclipse to Seam – that option, however, is only available if you have JBoss tools installed. See figure 2.1 and 2.2.
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Best 5 Java open-source web application frameworks

JSF

Some programmers think JSF has a steep learning curve

When it comes to developing web applications using Java, writing all the code from scratch has its advantages if you’re trying to master a new technology, but for real life web applications, you have to go for a framework as many expert developers would agree. Otherwise you risk a great deal of failure because of having allocated too much time and too many resources by re-inventing the wheels.

There are some hardliners who still argue why there’s ever a need for a framework, since everything can be accomplished by Servlets, JSP and Filters. One of them is Bear Bibeault author of JQuery in Action.

-Adeel Ansari

The cost is an important factor—although “free” in most cases also means widespread usage, community support, and no dependence on a single vendor. It takes some time for developers to get used to a framework and be good at it. Therefore choosing a framework as a long-term strategy. You cannot be switching frameworks for every project. Sticking with one framework also helps as once the expertise in that framework builds up; customizing the framework also becomes a possibility.

A tempting option is for organizations to build their own framework to address needs specific to the kind of work the organization undertakes. Although it does seam seem to make sense on paper, for my money, this is a suicidal strategy. Thoroughly testing and maintaining a framework is a huge task that will need dedicated human resources. These few people would become critical and the only source of support for others using that framework. Also, with so many quality frameworks available for free, I seriously doubt it really is necessary.

As with many web frameworks emerging nowadays, the ever-increasing number of Java web application frameworks out there today is intimidating for many developers even to look into because of being presented with too many choices. However, matching the criteria of popularity, widespread usage and tooling support, I can list a few of the best Java web application frameworks here and in a descending order of my personal choice. Sorry if I haven’t listed your favorite Java web framework here, feel free to agree or disagree in the comments section. Continue reading